Knockbain

   KNOCKBAIN, or Kilmuir Wester and Suddy, a parish, in the county of Ross and Cromarty, 3½ miles (N. N. W.) from Inverness; containing, with the villages of Charlestown and Munlochy, 2565 inhabitants. Previously to the union of the counties of Ross and Cromarty, this parish was locally in the county of Ross only. The name Kilmuir is Gaelic, implying "a church dedicated to Mary;" and Suddy signifies "a good place for a settlement." The two districts, once separate parishes, were united in 1756, when they received the name of Knockbain, by which they have since been called, but which was originally applied only to a cold and desolate moor, whereon the church and manse are built. Little is known concerning the ancient history of the parish; but the remains of many cairns on the field of Blair-na-coi are said to be the memorials of a sanguinary conflict which took place near the spot, in the thirteenth century, between the famous Mc Donalds and the people of Inverness. The length of the parish is between six and seven miles, and its breadth between five and six; it is bounded on the south by the Moray Frith, and on the north-west by the parish of Killearnan. The climate is tolerably healthy. The soil is generally good, but differs greatly throughout, consisting of the several varieties of sandy loam, clay loam, moor earth, moss, gravel, and alluvial deposits. The number of acres on the estates of four of the five heritors in the parish is, 3458 arable land, 3496 plantation, and 3323 pasture or uncultivated: the number of acres on the estate of Suddy is not precisely known. Large quantities of wheat and barley are raised, and the farmers grow also oats, peas, turnips, and potatoes. The woods consist of Scotch fir, larch, and one very large and recent plantation of oak, for which the planter received a premium from the Highland Society. The estate of Drumderfit contains the most important farm in the parish: this farm has been for some centuries in possession of the same family, who have brought it to a high state of cultivation by the large sums from time to time expended upon it. At Allangrange, Suddy, Muirends, Munlochy, and Wester Kessock, considerable quantities of waste land have been recovered. The farms generally have been portioned into the most suitable dimensions; good houses and fences have been raised, and the most recent improvements in husbandry skilfully applied. On some lands, particularly those of Wester Kessock, great encouragement has been given by granting long leases. The subsoil of the parish is clayey, in many parts tenacious, and sometimes covered with a thin stratum of iron-ore, mixed with gravel and sandstone: the rocks are of the old sandstone formation. The rateable annual value of Knockbain is £6772.
   There are two villages, one named Munlochy, the other Charlestown; the latter is opposite the northern entrance of the Caledonian canal, and both are built on the estate of Sir Colin Mc Kenzie, Bart., of Kilcoy. A considerable trade has been carried on for several years with Newcastle and Hull, by the exportation of fir-props, in exchange for which lime and coal are received. A post-office is established, and the roads are in good repair: that from Dingwall to Kessock-Ferry passes through the western part of the parish, and the roads from Kessock to Fortrose and Invergordon, and from Fortrose to Beauly, run through the centre of it. The ecclesiastical affairs are subject to the presbytery of Chanonry and synod of Ross. The stipend of the minister is £205, with a manse, a glebe of the annual value of £22, and a composition of £1 yearly in lieu of the privilege of cutting peat: the patronage belongs to the Crown, and the family of Mc Kenzie, of Cromarty. The church is an ancient structure: when repaired about thirty years ago, it was sufficiently enlarged to admit 250 additional hearers, and at present it accommodates nearly 800 persons. The members of the Free Church have a place of worship; and there is an episcopal chapel. The parochial schoolmaster has the maximum salary, with a house, and about £13 fees. There is another school, supported by the General Assembly's committee, and called Principal Baird's school, the master of which has a salary of £25, and the fees. In each of these schools the ordinary branches of education are taught, and some of the Latin authors. Major-General Mc Kenzie, who was M.P. for Sutherland, and who fell while supporting one of the wings of the British army at Talavera, was born here: a monument has been raised to his memory in St. Paul's Cathedral, London.

A Topographical dictionary of Scotland. . 1856.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ross, Skye and Lochaber (UK Parliament constituency) — UK constituency infobox alt Name = Ross, Skye and Lochaber Type = County Entity = Scotland DivisionType = Council areas Division = Highland Year = 2005 MP = Charles Kennedy Party = Liberal Democrats EP = ScotlandRoss, Skye and Lochaber is a… …   Wikipedia

  • Free Church of Scotland (post-1900) — This article concerns the Free Church of Scotland after 1900. For the Free Church of Scotland existing during the 19th century, see Free Church of Scotland (1843 1900). The contemporary Free Church of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: An Eaglais Shaor ) …   Wikipedia

  • List of community council areas in Scotland — This is a list of community council areas established in each of the council areas of Scotland.Aberdeen CityThere are 31 community council areas in the council area. Those marked with an asterisk have a community council. [… …   Wikipedia

  • Saw pit — A saw pit or sawpit is a pit over which lumber is positioned to be sawed with a long two handled saw by two men, one standing above the timber and the other below. [http://www.thefreedictionary.com/sawpit sawpit ] and… …   Wikipedia

  • List of places in Highland — This article is a list of links for any town, village, hamlet and settlements, in the Highland council area in Scotland. The area encompassed by the Highland council is a slightly different area to that encompassed by the Scottish… …   Wikipedia

  • Sidey — This name, with variant spellings Sutty, Syddie, Sidey, Sudy etc., is of Scottish locational origin either from Suddie in the parish of Knockbain in the Black Isle or from Suthie in Perthshire. The name, in both cases, is believed to derive from… …   Surnames reference

  • Sudy — This name, with variant spellings Sutty, Syddie, Sidey, Sudy etc., is of Scottish locational origin either from Suddie in the parish of Knockbain in the Black Isle or from Suthie in Perthshire. The name, in both cases, is believed to derive from… …   Surnames reference

  • Suttie — This name, with variant spellings Sutty, Syddie, Sidey, Sudy etc., is of Scottish locational origin either from Suddie in the parish of Knockbain in the Black Isle or from Suthie in Perthshire. The name, in both cases, is believed to derive from… …   Surnames reference

  • Sutty — This name, with variant spellings Sutty, Syddie, Sidey, Sudy etc., is of Scottish locational origin either from Suddie in the parish of Knockbain in the Black Isle or from Suthie in Perthshire. The name, in both cases, is believed to derive from… …   Surnames reference

  • Syddie — This name, with variant spellings Sutty, Syddie, Sidey, Sudy etc., is of Scottish locational origin either from Suddie in the parish of Knockbain in the Black Isle or from Suthie in Perthshire. The name, in both cases, is believed to derive from… …   Surnames reference

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.